Johann Hari in the Indie names the unnamable about the G20

First the good news. We now have a solar water heater installed, as of this week – and it’s brilliant.

I’m sure that it took vastly more CO2 to construct and install than it will ever save. But when things get bad, and gas goes off, at least we’ll have hot water.

As long, that is, as we have mains power, as the pumps and controllers all need electricity… And yes, we do do still have the Aga in the kitchen on the right. But she’s about to be switched off for the summer, as we switch to cooking with much more efficient magnetic induction hobs until the autumn.

I know that my blogging can sometimes feel a bit desperate and maybe even extreme, in its relentless focus on the negatives of what is now likely to happen. But do read Johann Hari in the Independent today.

Unlike anyone else I’ve heard or read in the mainstream coverage of the G20 summit just concluded, Hari names it.

“We are facing ‘devastating consequences’,” writes Hari, quoting scientists from the recent meeting in Copenhagen. “Not in some distant future, but in my lifetime and yours. Unless we swerve fast, we are soon going to hit global temperatures that no human being has ever lived through.”

I rest my case, and remain sadly convinced that humankind will not make the changes that might avert disaster.

We have to prepare for the worst – that message surely has to be at the heart of what we say and do. As psychotherapists claiming a modicum of consciousness, I believe we must build our approach to healing on an awareness that this, sadly, is now a death watch for almost everything we currently take for granted.

So, this climate change blog is going to take a break for a while, as I cycle over Easter to Findhorn for a week’s contemplation of a not-yet-silent spring. If you are amused or stimulated to follow that trip, I’ll be posting a thought or two here as I pedal north.